Ogee Plaster Coving

Ogee Plaster Coving

The ogee curve has been incorporated into the design of buildings for hundreds of years and was originally used by the Greeks and then adopted by Roman architects.

It became increasingly popular from the Georgian period and can be seen in internal timber mouldings such as skirting boards and architraves also fire surrounds and the stone cornices and pediments of the grander buildings of the period.

The ogee form was used in the design of plaster cornices throughout the Victorian and Edwardian periods and is still very popular today as it matches the ogee curves still used in timber architraves, skirting boards and kitchen design.

We have a number of different sizes of ogee plaster coving which we measure in the following way, drop  which is, how far the coving comes down the wall when it is fitted , and projection, how far the coving projects into the ceiling when it is fitted. Please remember these measurements are not the same as measuring across the face of the coving once it is fitted, this is a common mistake and can lead to customers ordering the wrong size of plaster coving.

Our largest ogee coving LPC080 has a drop of 200mm (10 inches) and is shown here in our stockport showroom which has a ceiling height of 10 foot, we then have LPC001 which has a drop and projection of 150 mm (six inches) also suitable for high ceilings, and then a range of smaller sizes such as MPC051 one of our most popular designs which has a drop of 110mm and projection of 106mm, also popular is MPC080 which combines an ogee curve above an egg and dart moulding and is a classic Victorian plaster coving design.

Our smallest ogee cornice design is SPC006 which has a drop 50mm and projection of 55mm and is generally used where there is not enough room due to lowered ceilings and window heights rather than the actual ceiling height.

Samples of all our different ogee plaster cornices can be ordered off the individual product pages and we would always recommend customers order a sample before placing an actual plaster coving order as you often find that your room will take either a bigger or smaller plaster cornice design than you originally thought.

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